FAQs



If you have a question which is not answered here, please contact us and we will do our best to answer it. 
 

Do I need a Clinical Psychologist?


Clinical Psychologists are highly trained professionals who help people who have difficulties with their emotional or mental health. If you are seeking a therapy to be delivered by a highly qualified professional aiming to help you to make changes to improve how you are feeling rather than simply listening to you or taking medication then a psychologist may be what you are looking for.
 

What is the difference between a Clinical Psychologist and other therapists?


Clinical Psychologists have Doctoral level training in more than one therapy for a wide variety of difficulties across age ranges. It takes on average 7 to 10 years to train as a Clinical Psychologist which includes academic study, research training, clinical training and supervised practice. Clinical training involves 3 years of supervised practice with clients across the age range in a number of core areas; adult, child and adolescent, learning disabilites, older adults and neuropsychological testing. This includes attainment of an undergraduate psychology degree and Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. They also have training in the use of psychometrics and in research and audit. By law they also have to register with the HCPC in order to practice and must adhere to high levels of professional practice standards and conduct. The titles 'Psychologist', 'Counsellor', 'Therapist' and 'Psychotherapist' are not protected by law, therefore anyone can use them regardless of their training or experience. There are a number of other titles which are protected by law in the UK through the HCPC. You can find out about these and check is a practitioner is registered here.
 
 

What is the difference between a Psychiatrist and a Clinical Psychologist?


A psychiatrist is a medical doctor who has specialised in psychiatry. They primarily understand, diagnose and treat emotional difficulties using a medical model and can prescribe medication to alleviate symptoms. Clinical Psychologists are not medical doctors, they cannot prescribe medication. Clinical Psychologists use psychological theory to help them understand difficulties. They offer a variety of talking therapies for a wide variety of difficulties informed by current research evidence as what is likely to be most effective. Clinical Psychologists often work alongside Psychiatrists, therefore client may be taking medications as well as taking part in a talking therapy but some people prefer one or the other.
 

Do I have to tell my GP?


No. However, due to being bound by ethical codes and a duty of care, if you give information to suggest that you or someone else is at risk of harm I may need to pass on information to a third party and this may be your GP. You can read more about confidentiality here.

In addition, if you would like your GP to be informed of your progress this can be arranged with your written consent. We can also provide an assessment only service and provide an assessment letter with treatment recommendations for your GP if you are having difficulty accessing NHS services.
 

Is my problem ‘bad enough’ for therapy?


If your difficulty is affecting you to the degree that you are considering therapy, then therapy is likely to be helpful. Please contact us to discuss how we might be able to help. There is no cut off for what might be deemed 'bad enough'.
 

Is therapy confidential?


Everything discussed in sessions is confidential between you and your therapist. However there are some limits to confidentiality. You can read more about this here.
 

How can I be sure a therapist is qualified?


Depending on what profession the therapist belongs to, you can check. Clinical Psychologists in the UK have to register with the HCPC by law in order to practice (statutory regulation) and must adhere to high levels of professional practice standards and conduct. There are a number of titles which are protected by law in the UK through the HCPC, including 'Counselling Psychologist', 'Practitioner Psychologist', 'Clinical Psychologist' and 'Registered Psychologist'. You can find out about these and check is a practitioner is registered here. The titles 'Psychologist', 'Counsellor', 'Therapist' and 'Psychotherapist' are not protected by law, therefore anyone can use them regardless of their training or experience, therefore this could be anything from a days training to several years. Therapists providing certain therapies (including those not regualted by law) may choose to register with a professional body such as the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP). This is the main professional body for behavioural and cognitive psychotherapists, who often do not come from professional backgrounds for which there is statutory regulation in the UK. You can find out more about the BABCP here. This organisation aims to maintain standards for practitioners by offering accreditation for those who meet minimum standards. 

 

Do you have a waiting list?


We do not currently operate a waiting list. Appointments will be made in advance at a mutually convenient time for you and your therapist.
 

Do I have to lie on a couch?


There are many ways of providing different types of therapy and whilst we want you to be as comfortable as possible in sessions, you will be offered a chair to sit on.
 
Contact me today to have an informal chat before making an appointment.
There is no charge for this initial discussion. 

Tel: 07894 038084
Email: click here


                                                       

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